Canadian Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Examining the Relationship Between Perceptions of a Known Person Who Stutters and Attitudes Toward Stuttering

 
Author(s) Charles D. Hughes
Rodney M. Gabel
Scott T. Palasik
Volume 41
Number 3
Year 2017
Page(s) 237-252
Language English
Category Research Article
Keywords stuttering
familiarity
attitudes
perceptions
Abstract The focus of this study was to examine the association between familiarity and attitudes toward stuttering. In total, 152 participants completed a survey consisting of Likert-type questions where they rated their perceptions of a known person who stutters (PWS). Questions were organized for analysis into 3 categories, which included perceptions of the quality of the relationship; how the known PWS copes with stuttering; and perceived impact of stuttering. Participants then completed a semantic differential scale related to their attitudes toward the known PWS, and were asked to complete the same scale thinking of an average PWS. Significant positive correlations were found between ratings of the quality of the relationship with the known PWS and positive ratings of their traits. Furthermore, how important the known PWS was to a participant was positively correlated with ratings of an average PWS as trustworthy and reliable. Perceptions regarding how the known PWS coped with stuttering were positively correlated with positive ratings of this person’s traits. The most significant negative correlations were observed between perceptions of how stuttering impacted the known PWS and attitudes toward the known and average PWS. That is, the more participants perceived stuttering impacting the known PWS, the more negative their perceptions were of the known and average PWS. Findings provide support for encouraging the public to become familiar with individuals who stutter who demonstrate positive management with stuttering. Furthermore, this study helps clarify inconsistencies reported in the literature related to the impact of familiarity on attitudes toward stuttering.

Cette étude vise à explorer la relation entre la familiarité des individus envers le bégaiement et leurs attitudes face à ce trouble de la parole. Au total, 152 participants ont rempli un questionnaire utilisant des échelles de Likert et leur demandant d’évaluer leurs perceptions envers une personne bègue qu’ils connaissent. Les questions ont été regroupées en trois catégories pour les analyses :
la perception des individus concernant la qualité de leur relation avec la personne bègue qu’ils connaissent, la perception des individus quant à l’adaptation de la personne bègue qu’ils connaissent face au bégaiement et la perception des individus quant à l’impact du bégaiement. Les participants ont ensuite rempli une échelle sémantique différentielle portant sur leurs attitudes envers la personne bègue qu’ils connaissent. Ils ont également rempli la même échelle en pensant à une personne bègue typique. Les résultats montrent que la qualité de la relation des individus avec la personne bègue qu’ils connaissent est positivement et significativement corrélée avec une évaluation positive de leurs traits de personnalité. De plus, l’importance d’une personne bègue aux yeux des participants est positivement corrélée avec une perception que les personnes bègues typiques sont fiables et dignes de confiance. La perception des participants à propos de la façon dont la personne bègue qu’ils connaissent s’adapte au bégaiement est positivement corrélée avec une évaluation positive des traits de personnalité de cette personne. Les résultats montrent que les corrélations négatives les plus significatives portent sur la relation entre la perception des participants à propos de la façon dont le bégaiement affecte la personne bègue qu’ils connaissent et leurs attitudes envers la personne bègue qu’ils connaissent et les personnes bègues typiques. En d’autres mots, plus les participants perçoivent que le bégaiement affecte la personne bègue qu’ils connaissent, plus ils perçoivent négativement la personne bègue qu’ils connaissent et les personnes bègues typiques. Les résultats suggèrent que d’apprendre à connaitre une personne bègue qui prend en charge son bégaiement de façon positive devrait être encouragé au sein du public. Cette étude contribue également à clarifier les discordances rapportées dans la littérature à propos de l’impact de la familiarité des individus envers le bégaiement et leurs attitudes face à ce trouble de la parole.
Record ID 1215
Link http://cjslpa.ca/files/2017_CJSLPA_Vol_41/No_03/CJSLPA_Vol_41_No_3_2017_Hughes_et_al_237-252.pdf
 
Share |

CJSLPA is an open access journal which means that all articles are available on the Internet to all users immediately upon publication. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles, or use them for any other lawful purpose.

CJSLPA does not charge authors publication or processing fees.

Copyright of the Canadian Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology is held by Speech-Language and Audiology Canada (SAC). Appropriate credit must be given (SAC, publication name, article title, volume number, issue number and page number[s]) but not in any way that suggests SAC endorses you or your use of the work. You may not use this work for commercial purposes. You may not alter, transform, or build upon this work.